Eureka Peak Overlook (Joshua Tree National Park)

 

 

Coachella Valley as seen from Eureka Peak.

Coachella Valley as seen from Eureka Peak.

 

Most people enjoy the opportunity to visit an overlook of vast valleys, and in Joshua Tree National Park, that is no different.  On any given day the Keys View overlook is jam-packed with tourists from around the world, each with their camera in hand, taking snap-shots of Coachella Valley and Mount San Jacinto.  It can get a bit crowded and there is also a known killer bee issue in this portion of park, causing my wife and I to have dubbed the overlook, Bee’s View.

In the less frequented Covington Flats section of the park, there is the Eureka Peak Overlook. Sitting at 5,521 ft, Eureka Peak provides stunning views of the Coachella Valley, and San Jacinto – it is an equal contender as the most picturesque overlook in the National Park. There are no paved roads here, no built up stone walls, or sidewalks.

So why is Eureka Peak, and Covington Flats so much quieter than the rest of the park?  Covington Flats is not accessible via the park’s main entrances from the towns of Joshua Tree, and Twentynine Palms, making this a very isolated area. La Contenta Road, a well graded dirt road is accessed where the towns of Joshua Tree and Yucca Valley meet along Yucca Trail/Alta Loma Road. La Contenta eventually meets up with Covington Flat Road, and you can easily follow the signs to Eureka Peak (also see the map included on this page).

For those feeling more adventurous a hiking trail leads from Black Rock Canyon Campground to Eureka Peak.  The hike is 9.5 miles round trip, with an elevation gain of 1,600 ft.

 

San Jacinto as viewed from Eureka Peak.

San Jacinto as viewed from Eureka Peak.

 

Overlooking Desert Hot Springs, with the San Bernardino Mountains.

Overlooking Desert Hot Springs, with the San Bernardino Mountains.

 

San Jacinto

San Jacinto

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.

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