Bullmoose Mine / Gold Ace Mine

I was just reviewing photographs from a 2012 trip to Beatty when I came across a series that I had shot at a mine located about seven miles southeast of town along the Bare Mountains. I had never looked into the mine, and knew nothing about it so the photographs ended up being thrown to the wayside. It turns out that the mine is the Bullmoose Mine, it was discovered in 1913 (I’m not sure who the discovered was). Jules V. Baird, the superintendent at Carrara purchased it in 1915 for $156,000.

The World Mine Register, Vol. 13 (1918) described the Bullmoose as such, “In the Bull Moose mine, gold ore occurs in stringers of calcite in a belt of dolomitic-limestone about 100′ wide. Values average $9, with highest values on the footwall. The Shindel orebody, 3′ wide, and uncovered for over 40′ contains rich pockets and stringers of gold in calcite, claiming to run as high as $100 per ton.”

 

Gold Ace Mine

Gold Ace Mine

 

The road leading out to the Gold Ace from Highway 95.

The road leading out to the Gold Ace from Highway 95.

 

In 1928 the mine was leased to G. Ray Boggs, and the name was changed to the Gold Ace. The ore from the Gold Ace was being processed two miles south at what is now the ghost town of Carrara, NV. The Carrara townsite was set up to support the marble mine east of town, and supported a small population of about one-hundred people.

Ultimately, the Gold Ace never amounted to much success, having a relatively short run. In 1929 it was reported that the mine was being operated by an unlicensed engineer, causing the State Inspector of Mines to forcibly remove the operator. The mine has been silent ever since.

 

Structurally sound ore chute.

Structurally sound ore chute.

 

Electrical poles, along with a road carved into the side of the mountain.

Electrical poles, along with a road carved into the side of the mountain.

 

Open shaft.

Open shaft.

 

Very little remains at the mine, the tram that once stood has collapsed from years of decay. There is a large ore chute that remains structurally sound, along with maybe a half-dozen old electrical poles. Several stone walls can be found still standing, and the roads that were carved across the property are still very visible. There are at least two unsealed adits of unknown length.

There are many sources that misidentify the ruins directly along the east side of Highway 95 (below the Gold Ace) as the ruins of the Gold Ace, Carrara, and/or the Carrara Mill. These ruins are actually the Elizalde Concrete plant, which was built in the 1930’s. There is no relationship between this site, and Carrara or the Gold Ace.

 

This adit appears sound. I took a quick look inside, but since I was alone didn't go in very far.

This adit appears sound. I took a quick look inside, but since I was alone didn’t go in very far.

 

A quick peek inside.

A quick peek inside.

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.