Imperial Mine (Dale Mining District)

Imperial Mine - Dale Mining District - Claim marker

 

The Imperial Mine is one of the lesser discussed mines in the Dale Mining District. This gold mine is located in Humbug Mountain; and is a little far removed from the main area that most think of when it comes to the Dale. Verified historic details of the mine is scant, and nothing really remains of major significance from its mining past.

The mine is made up of two shafts, and a connecting shaft. A wooden rock chute has been built into the connecting shaft, allowing for easier removal of material from the upper shaft, 100 feet above. Wooden support structures and braces have been built into the main tunnel, and they appear to be sound. An empty storage room shoots off from the main tunnel.

 

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District - One of two bulk heads in the main shaft.

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District – One of two bulkheads in the main shaft.

 

The upper adit had been open until recently, a head frame sat in a large dugout room, it has since been sealed off with stone fill.

The walls of the mine are mostly made up of sandstone with iron deposits. There is a large concentration of manganese dendrites on the walls, while this appears to look like fossilized plants, it is actually a crystal. Dendritic crystals form from growth instabilities that occur when the growth rate is limited by the rate of diffusion of solute atoms to the interface. For more information on dendrites read this short piece by Susan Landa, of the Fossil Cartel Inc.

 

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District - Manganese dendrites on the walls of the main shaft.

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District – Manganese dendrites on the walls of the main shaft.

 

 

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District - The sealed upper shaft.

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District – The sealed upper shaft.

 

 

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District - Some historic mining trash, and a concrete foundation at the base of Humbug Mountain.

Imperial Mine – Dale Mining District – Some historic mining trash, and a concrete foundation at the base of Humbug Mountain.

 

 

 

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.