Jackass Spring Petroglyphs (Death Valley National Park)

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs - Close-up of the large panel.
Setting the scene - Hunter Mountain, near Jackass Spring.

Setting the scene – Hunter Mountain, near Jackass Spring.

 

Hunter Mountain is a forested gem in an ocean of hot dry desert – at an elevation of 7,140 feet, the temperatures are cooler, there is more game, as well as an abundance of water.

The Timbisha Shoshone, at one time inhabited the valleys below – Saline, Hidden, Racetrack – as well as Lee Flat. Hunter Mountain itself was also utilized for both summer and winter camps.¬† To the Timbisha, Hunter Mountain is a sacred hunting ground, a place that they once gathered at for communal rabbit and antelope hunts. The mountain’s vegetation also provided the material needed to make baskets.

Because of this sacred bond with the mountain, it only makes sense that there would “rock art” sites scattered throughout the mountain side.

One of these sites is located at Jackass Spring – a very easy to reach site and it is clearly visible from Hunter Mountain Road. The site is small, containing roughly two dozen designs – pecked on a granite outcropping.

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs - While driving Hunter Road near Jackass Spring, pay attention for this rock outcropping, which can clearly be seen from the road.

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs – While driving Hunter Road near Jackass Spring, pay attention for this rock outcropping, which can clearly be seen from the road.

 

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs - Close-up of the large panel.

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs – Close-up of the large panel.

 

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs - Close-up of the side panel.

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs – Close-up of the side panel.

 

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs

Jackass Spring Petroglyphs

 

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.

4 Comments

  • I visited some petroglyphs in the north end of the Saline Valley near an old mining area that had a creek running through it. Up in the canyon above there were several water falls. Along the road going up, there was a large rock as big as a motor home with grinding holes on top and an arrista near by. Across the road there was a hillside covered with art. You couldn’t see the art until you hiked up to it so driving by you would likely miss it. here are some shots of the art and the view from the op of the hill looking towards the valley.

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