Jupiter Mine (Dale Mining District)

The Jupiter Mine is one of many hundreds of obscure mines in the Dale Mining District. It is situated along a stunning overlook that provides inspiring panoramic views of the valley below. The Jupiter consists of five claims, and adjoins the Carlyle Mine on both the west and the south. Like the Carlyle, the Jupiter was also a gold producer. It was operated by Frank H. Berger and Matt Gilbert, of 619 N. Palm Ave., Los Angeles; with Hugh Leonard, superintendent. The dates of operation are unknown, however a 1938 edition of “California journal of mines and geology,” provides some detail regarding the then current status of the operation: “Development consists of a tunnel 200 ft. in length, also sinking shaft on the southwest end of the property. Ore mined is shipped to the Gold Crown mill for treatment. Ten men employed.”

 

Killer view from the Jupiter Mine.

Killer view from the Jupiter Mine.

 

My first impression was turquoise, however further research may indicate it to be chrysocolla.

My first impression was turquoise, however further research may indicate it to be chrysocolla.

 

Bob Dunkin reported in his 2010 paper on the Dale Mining District that, “The property has two parallel veins about 30 feet apart running northeast and southwest, dipping 85 degrees west, and averaging 6 feet in width. The principal development was confined to the west vein, known as the Jupiter, and consisted of a tunnel being driven 225 feet on the vein with over 500 feet of crosscuts and raises. On the south end of the vein, a shaft was sunk to a depth of 250 feet. Total production was 43,850 dollars.”

My visit to the Jupiter Mine was entirely an accident, I wasn’t looking for it, but it became a welcome addition to the outing. Very little remains on the surface of the mine, a water tank, a concrete tank, rusty piping, and corrugated metal. The one shaft which I located has been shored up with concrete along the upper vertical portion of the shaft. A metal ladder rested down into the shaft, held together with electrical tape – yeah, no way was I trusting that thing.

Lying around the tailings was a significant amount of stone with blue veins running through it. My first impression was that it was turquoise, however further research may indicate it to be chrysocolla, a mineral which is often mistaken for turquoise.

 

Peeking into the shaft. That ladder is held together with electrical tape. YIKES!

Peeking into the shaft. That ladder is held together with electrical tape. YIKES!

 

Assorted rusty metal.

Assorted rusty metal.

 

Scarce ruins at the Jupiter Mine.

Scarce ruins at the Jupiter Mine.

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.

1 Comment

  • Doesn’t it strike you that this mine has been worked recently, with concrete shoring, metal ladders, things like that? Is there such a thing as black market mining, working a mine without reporting it or getting any kind of claim?

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