Logan City, NV

Logan City is a late 1800s mining community located along the eastern flank of Mount Irish. The small town sprung up around a silver strike that took place in 1865. Stories surrounding the strike indicate that a Native American woman led a group of prospectors to the ledge of silver, probably feeling bad for them after having struck out on their own.

Once the camp was set up and mining began, it was attacked by the local Native American tribe, chasing off the miners. A short time later a new camp sprang up a short distance from the mine, and within a few months there were over one hundred people called Logan City home.  One year later the population swelled to 300, and in July of 1868, the community received a post office under the name Logan Springs.

 

Logan City in 1871.

Logan City in 1871.

 

It wasn’t long after the post office opened its door that Logan City began to decline. The silver began to run out, and residents relocated to the new community of Pioche. The post office closed in August of 1871, putting the final nail in the coffin. Some mining continued in the area until World War II.

Today at the site of Logan City, there are a few structures that remain standing in various states of disarray. The large roofless stone building may very well be period to the original Logan City community, however the other structures are far more recent. Near an outcropping of volcanic ash there are several stones walls, foundations, and can dumps that remain from the original settlement.

 

The earliest structure that remains standing at Logan City.

The earliest structure that remains standing at Logan City.

 

Inside of the structure. Someone has painted some of the stone in the walls.

Inside of the structure. Someone has painted some of the stone in the walls.

 

Overview of what remains of Logan City.

Overview of what remains of Logan City.

 

Lots of stone walls hidden among the pine trees.

Lots of stone walls hidden among the pine trees.

 

Can dumps like this one are frequent and vary in size.

Can dumps like this one are frequent and vary in size.

 

Another overview of Logan City. The volcanic formation seen in the background is the same formation that is in the 1871 photograph.

Another overview of Logan City. The volcanic formation seen in the background is the same formation that is in the 1871 photograph.

 
Secret Places in the Mojave Desert Vol. 7

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.

Leave a Comment