Noonday Camp, CA

 

The Noonday mines are located in the Alexander Hills, roughly 7 miles Southeast of modern-day Tecopa. The Noonday mines refer to a number of silver-lead mines, which include the Noonday, War Eagle, Gunsight, and Columbia.

The mines had originally been discovered in 1875 by the Brown brothers, but were quickly bought out by Jonas Osborne in 1877. Osbourne and company operated the mines until 1881.

During these earliest days of mining, Noonday Camp had yet to be established. The miners lived at the original Tecopa location, which was just a short distance away from where Noonday Camp would come to be built.

In 1907 the Tonopah & Tidewater Railroad was built through Amargosa Canyon. The Tecopa town site was moved as a result, to its current modern-day location.

 

Noonday Camp - The entrance to the War Eagle Mine

Noonday Camp – The entrance to the War Eagle Mine

 

 

From 1907-1928 the Noonday mines operated under Lincoln D. Godshall. Under his administration the mines finally became profitable. This wouldn’t be the last time that the Noonday group would change hands. In the 1940’s, The Finley Company would take over the mining operation, they built Noonday Camp for the use of the miners.

Again the mines would change hands in the late 1940’s. The Anaconda Mining Company took over and operated until 1957. Western Talc would take over in 1957 and be the last mining operation at the Noonday mines, closing their doors in 1972.

Little remains at Noonday Camp for being a relatively newer ghost town. The only remaining structure that still stands at the town site is the cinder block vault that was used to hold the company script, which was used to pay the miners. Roughly twenty foundations can be stumbled upon when searching the brush, along with a small graveyard.

Many of the mines in the Noonday group are popular for exploration amongst mining enthusiasts and underground explorer groups.

 

Noonday Camp - Massive ore bin outside of the War Eagle Mine

Noonday Camp – Massive ore bin outside of the War Eagle Mine

 

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.