Tucki Mine (Death Valley National Park)

 

The Tucki Mine is tucked away on the southwest flank of Tucki Mountain, part of the Panamint Mountain Range. It is reached via Tucki Mine Road, a ten-mile stretch of dirt road, which leaves the pavement 1.7 miles up Wildrose Road from Emigrant Junction. The road travels up a section of Telephone Canyon, before splitting off into a side canyon.

The natural beauty of the canyon,the peaks, and the vast views of the valley are the show stealer here. The mine ruins pale in comparison to the breathtaking beauty of the natural world that surround it. There are several vantages that allow for optimal viewing of Death Valley.  Roughly 1.25 miles before the Tucki Mine ruins, a spur road travels north up the ridge. Follow this road for .75 miles to the wilderness boundary for an intense overview of the valley, and the Funeral Mountains. For those that are interested you can continue to hike this road for 1 mile east to the original Tucki Mine cabin (I opted not to).

 

Stunning views of Death Valley and the Funeral Mountains.

Stunning views of Death Valley and the Funeral Mountains.

 

The Funeral Mountains

The Funeral Mountains

 

The Funeral Mountains

The Funeral Mountains

 

The next overview worth mentioning, is accessed by passing the Tucki Mine, again driving to the wilderness boundary, and hiking further down canyon.  While I find the first overlook the better of the two, this one is still worth mentioning.

The Tucki Mine ruins consist of a barely standing head frame and ore chute, four-fifty ton leeching tanks, and concrete foundations.  There is also the decrepit cabin, and small out building.  The cabin itself is from the late era of mining that transpired here in the 1970’s. It contains full furnishings, but has begun to succumb to the elements, the roof having collapsed over half of the building. In the not so distant future, this cabin will likely become another pile of lumber – its weathered boards washing away down canyon in a flash flood.

The Tucki Mine was first discovered in 1909 by Henry W. Britt. It was later relocated by John Millett, Samuel E. Ball, and Charles G. Walker in 1927, but no records of production are available prior to 1937. The mine was operated on and off from 1937 – 1975(ish), often by a lessee, and with little to no profit. Leading me to believe that the miners were also there for the view.

 

This headframe and ore chute are holding on for dear life.

This headframe and ore chute are holding on for dear life.

 

Leaching tanks.

Leaching tanks.

 

Various treasures are littered across the landscape.

Various treasures are littered across the landscape.

 

The inside of the Tucki Mine Cabin - you can clearly see that the roof is collapsing.

The inside of the Tucki Mine Cabin – you can clearly see that the roof is collapsing.

 

Another view of inside of the Tucki Mine Cabin.

Another view of inside of the Tucki Mine Cabin.

 

About the author

Jim Mattern

Jim is a scapegoat for the NPS, an author, adventurer, photographer, radio personality, guide, and location scout. His interests lie in Native American and cultural sites, ghost towns, mines, and natural wonders in the American Deserts.

  • pat

    I like the format Jim.